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Kigi $10.99 $8.99
Average Rating:4.6 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
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2 2
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Kigi
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Kigi
Publisher: Smart Play Games
by Ryan L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/27/2015 10:09:34

This is a well-designed and beautifully illustrated game. It travels well, and is very quick to learn and play. Also one of few small games that works for five players when most can only play four.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kigi
Publisher: Smart Play Games
by Richard M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/13/2015 00:16:29

Played this with my wife at a restaurant, and people kept stopping is to ask what we were playing. This game is strikingly beautiful.

It's also great, thanks, fun. Loved it.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kigi
Publisher: Smart Play Games
by Ben G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/27/2015 12:21:50

Kigi is a rare blend of artistic arrangement and strategic game play, wrapped into a $9 price tag. Game play is fairly simple - build an artistic rendering of a beautiful tree using non-grid card placement. That means that as long as you're constructing a viable looking tree, you can place cards anywhere! It's a great way to break out of the traditional mode of tile or card building games. Branches will spring up from your root tree in amazing and strange directions as you try to accumulate points. You earn points by stringing together consecutive elements - colorful flowers or artistic bugs.

The game encourages interaction as you can add to your own tree, or to other players. Add in a card collection element where you can prune branches 10 cards long or longer and throw in some interesting goals players can acquire along the way and you have a fantastic game. Highly replayable, full of interesting choices and simple play leading to more complex strategies. My 9 year old absolutely adores this game and it also makes a great addition to the table when it's the older crowd playing.

Kigi takes about 15-20 minutes to play once you get through your initial learning game. It has the added bonus of taking existing cards and creating new, flowing pieces of art right on your game table even as you're working to outscore other players and earn the most precious thing of all - points.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kigi
Publisher: Smart Play Games
by Zachary B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/21/2015 20:16:32

At less than $10, this beautiful game is a steal. I've never had my 5 and 8 year old daughters ask to play again and again and again. I feel the 10+ year old "suggestion" is a bit steep if your family plays any basic card games (Go Fish, Rummy, etc.), and you could easily play with a 3 year old just matching colors and shapes to make beautiful trees.

I feel in a way this is like art-inspired Rummy. You get points for each move matching contiguous sets of flowers or insects. You place a card on your tree or an opponents. If your points are too high you prune the entire set down to the trunk (including branches that weren't part of the point scoring). It's really simply just to play with that, but "commissions" add in big point moves if you end the game with certain criteria met, such as longest branch or least insects on your tree.

There are "right" moves, but we've been having so much fun just playing that the end score isn't a huge deal. There's good depth, and definitely risk/reward, but it's very light-hearted and fun. If your family plays games this is a must have.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kigi
Publisher: Smart Play Games
by Brian C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/09/2015 10:44:54

Kigi is that rare blend of art and game. Using the brush strokes and decorations provided by the cards in the game you not only 'create art' as a game play goal, but you create actual art right there on the table in front of you. The tree you create is unique to you and to that moment of play. Goals drive the direction of your creation, but you decide how and when to complete those goals and the resulting tree you bring to life is suitable for framing.

Daniel Solis' art and game design are, as is so often the case with him, brilliant. He's consistently good at taking very basic elements and creating fun and interesting game play and mechanics with them. Kigi is no exception and the fact that the strategic decisions are simple yet meaningful helped make Kigi one of the more interesting 'light' games I've played recently. Sure, you can concentrate on just painting your own tree, but would it be worth stopping that long enough to interfere with the paintings of your competitors? Since everything scores in chains, it might be vital to your success to do so.

Finally, while I myself enjoyed Kigi quite a bit, it hit an even more important marker. My parents, who are notoriously hard to engage in boardgames and cards games that don't look like traditional roll and move or pinochle, found Kigi to be to their liking and enjoyable to play with the entire family. The fact that they requested another game of it two days later speaks volumes once you realize they usually never make it past the first turn of most other games.

Go. Buy Kigi. It's worth the price.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kigi
Publisher: Smart Play Games
by Ben O. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/09/2015 07:37:06

Game of building up trees, trying to fulfil commissions and ultimately making something beautiful in front of you. The few rules about how to build up a tree (placed card has to join the tree but only touch one card when laid down) leads to a good sense of freedom. You score interim points by extending a branch on a tree where the symbols on the card you place match the ones already present. The symbols are a variety of bugs and flowers. If a placement scores 10 or more, that branch is 'pruned' and all the cards that scored have to be removed. You can also draw and collect the commissions that are in the deck instead of a branch card, and these give end game points based on various criteria: fewest or most cards in your tree, most flowers, fewest bugs and so on.

Once you realise that you can play a card on your turn onto any player's tree, the tactical play in this game reveals itself. Play on your own tree, or if you have the right card, play to an opponents to thwart their plans and to get a few points yourself. Coming up to the end of a game, you've got a card full of bugs in hand and your opponent has the fewest bugs commission in front of them? This game can be deceptively evil!

One issue we had with the game was purely emotional. The trees you can build are often very beautiful but this beauty often leads to points. Over 10 and you face the unpleasant task of pruning them back and leaving a bare tree!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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